Drugs found on-board foreign ship in Demerara River worth US$800M

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Arrow pointing to the section of the shipment where cocaine was concealed
Arrow pointing to the section of the shipment where cocaine was concealed

[www.inewsguyana.com] –The drug bust that was made today (Tuesday, January 06) in the Demerara River by Drug Enforcement Units in Guyana is worth approximately US$800M, according to the Guyana Revenue Authority (GRA).

The discovery was made by Law Enforcement and Investigation Division (LEID) and the Drug Examination Unit (DEU) of the GRA.

One hundred eighty five (185) packages (bricks) of cocaine, weighing 192 kilograms, 420grams were unearthed from the MV Delta Dies, a foreign vessel registered in Cyprus, GRA revealed.

GRA says its officials acted on intelligence provided by the United Nations Office on Drug and Crime (UNODC). The Customs Anti-Narcotics Unit was called in and together with officers of the GRA’s LEID and DEU, a search was conducted on the container.

It was noted that drugs were concealed in a flat rack which was on board the vessel that arrived in Guyana from Suriname with eleven crew members. The ship left the Netherlands via Paramaribo, Suriname then proceeded to Guyana to load bauxite. It was expected to proceed to Spain.

The crew has been arrested and is in police custody. Their nationalities are not known.

Some of the drugs found inside the container on board the vessel.
Some of the drugs found inside the container on board the vessel.

“Today’s discovery of narcotics onboard the ocean going vessel has once again proven the success of the GRA’s joint efforts in tackling the illicit drug trade. The GRA has long recognized the importance of forging regional and international linkages in the ongoing efforts at addressing challenges of a global magnitude such as drug trafficking and the smuggling of goods. The partnership has been successful on several fronts,” GRA noted.

In 2012, Guyana and Suriname joined the Container Control Programmes to improve port security and stop the use of containers for transnational criminal activities including the trafficking of narcotics.

This MoU has allowed both countries to strengthen the control of inbound and outgoing containers, improve real time exchange and analysis of information among other advantages.

 

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