Lamaha Springs’ residents decry deplorable condition of roads

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Residents of Lamaha Springs, Georgetown are calling on City Hall and the Public Infrastructure Ministry to look into their road woes as heavy-duty trucks have been the reason the roads have been deteriorating over the past months.

On Wednesday, residents complained to INews that the road which links Lamaha Park with Lamaha Springs was being destroyed by trucks. The road, they said, was one which they struggled to get after much waiting.

They said under the previous administration, former President Bharrat Jagdeo had visited the area and promised them to construct the road and it was done. Now, however, a private company is now dumping mud and other waste materials nearby and would traverse the road to dump the materials.

One resident, Sharon Davis explained that on Tuesday a truck laden with mud attempted to pass through the street, but became stuck in a hole.

She said the driver ended up digging another hole beneath the truck in an attempt to help it roll free. This, however, was to no avail until another truck came to the rescue.
The road was left in a terrible, broken state. Davis said cars could no longer use the road freely owing to the damage done.

“If the people…doing construction and got to bring in sand into the area, they telling the truck to come through here. Everything they got to do over there (with sand or mud) they telling the truck to come through here,” Davis complained.

She said the road was becoming worse every day.

Davis added that they did not know who to turn to for help, but were hoping the authorities would address the situation in a timely manner.

An elderly resident pointed to a section of the destroyed road, and said the water lines were just beneath the surface and she was afraid that it might be damaged as a result of the deterioration.

She too pointed out that residents in the area struggled before they got a road and they were not willing to sit back and watch it be destroyed, knowing that other communities were still pleading for their roads to be fixed, even after waiting for years.