Hillary Clinton set for the speech of her life

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(CNN) President Barack Obama on Wednesday handed his legacy to Hillary Clinton, setting her up for the speech of her life with a powerful endorsement and the enduring image of a warm embrace.

Clinton joined Obama on stage after his speech, and the President and his 2008 primary rival clung together in a shared moment of symbolism: the nation’s first African-American leader entrusting its future to the woman who could become its first female commander-in-chief.

Obama was in Philadelphia at the Democratic National Convention 12 years to the day after he shook politics with a convention speech in Boston that encouraged Americans to look at the common threads that unite them. He offered a similarly empowering vision of the nation Wednesday, saying America doesn’t need a “self declared savior” like Donald Trump to fix it.

US President Barrack Obama and Democratic Presidential Candidate Hillary Clinton wave to the crowd at the NDC on Wednesday night
US President Barack Obama and Democratic Presidential Candidate Hillary Clinton wave to the crowd after Obama spoke at the DNC on Wednesday (CNN photo) 

Undaunted by the experience of a presidency that unfolded in a time of crisis and deep ideological divides, he renewed his faith in the idea of a unified nation. The speech crystalized the two visions of America emerging this election season, following last week’s Republican National Convention in which Trump blasted Obama for leaving the country divided and plagued by crime.

“The America I know is full of courage, and optimism, and ingenuity,” Obama said. “The America I know is decent and generous. Sure, we have real anxieties — about paying the bills, protecting our kids, caring for a sick parent. We get frustrated with political gridlock, worry about racial divisions; are shocked and saddened by the madness of Orlando or Nice.”

He went on: “But as I’ve traveled this country, through all fifty states; as I’ve rejoiced with you and mourned with you, what I’ve also seen, more than anything, is what is right with America.”

Obama then made an impassioned case for Clinton, saying no man or woman had ever been as prepared to be president.

“Nothing truly prepares you for the demands of the Oval Office,” Obama said. “But Hillary’s been in the room; she’s been part of those decisions.”

He acknowledged Clinton had made mistakes, but compared her to Teddy Roosevelt’s valiant striver who errs, but also knows great triumphs.

“Hillary Clinton is that woman in the arena,” Obama said.

He also made an appeal to Bernie Sanders supporters who are still cool on Clinton.

“You’ve got to get in the arena with her, because democracy isn’t a spectator sport,” he said.

Throughout the night, speaker after speaker leveled heated criticism of Trump aimed at undermining his image as a tough guy who understands Americans. Vice President Joe Biden painted Trump as completely unqualified for the presidency.

“He is trying to tell us he cares about the middle class. Give me a break. That’s a bunch of malarky,” Biden said. “This guy doesn’t have a clue about the Middle Class. Not a clue.”

The crowd roared with approval, chanting “not a clue.”

Biden said Trump was unable to handle the complexities of a dangerous world.

“No major party nominee in the history of this nation has ever known less or has been less prepared to deal with our national security,” he said.

Biden used his address on the third night of the Democratic National Convention to appeal to middle-class voters, a group Clinton is under pressure to win over. Leveraging his blue-collar bona fides, he argued Clinton is intimately familiar with the economic disenfranchisement that helped power Trump’s rise.

‘Hillary gets it’

“Everybody knows she is smart,” Biden said. “Everybody knows she is tough. But I know what she is passionate about. I know Hillary. Hillary understands. Hillary gets it.”

Former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg, meanwhile, said he was not a Democrat or a Republican but appeared at the convention to demolish his fellow billionaire’s reputation in business.

“I believe we need a president who is a problem-solver, not a bomb-thrower,” said Bloomberg.

He quipped that unlike Trump, he didn’t start his business empire with a “million dollar check from my father.”

“Trump has left behind a well-documented record of bankruptcies, thousands of lawsuits, angry shareholders and contractors who feel cheated, and disillusioned customers who feel ripped off,” Bloomberg said. “Trump says he wants to run the nation like he’s run his business. God help us!”

“I am a New Yorker, and I know a con when I see one.”

He went on: “The bottom line is: Trump is a risky, reckless, and radical choice. And we can’t afford to make that choice!”

The night of the DNC also offered a big opportunity for Tim Kaine, Clinton’s vice presidential pick, who introduced himself to an audience unfamiliar with his years as a governor and senator in Virginia.

He affected an impression of Trump and used the billionaire’s verbal tick “Believe Me” to ridicule him as a “slick talking, empty promising, self promoting, one man wrecking crew.”

Noting that his son, Nat, deployed with the US Marines this week, Kaine quickly slammed Trump for raising the possibility that his administration wouldn’t always defend NATO allies.

Kaine said his son would “protect and defend the very NATO allies that Donald Trump now says he wants to abandon.”

He made a case that Americans should trust Clinton.

“I trust Hillary Clinton with our son’s life,” Kaine said. “You know who I don’t trust? Donald Trump.”

“You cannot believe one word that comes out of Donald Trump’s mouth. Not one word,” Kaine said, slamming the GOP nominee as a “slick talking, empty promising, self promoting, one man wrecking crew.”

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