Which animals do these eyes belong to?

0
237

There are many spectacular and colourful eyes in the animal kingdom, can you identify which animals these belong to?

Answers are below, no peeking until you have had at least one guess per photo. 

  • IMAGE ONE

(Credit: Solvin Zankl/Naturepl.com)

  • IMAGE TWO

(Credit: Klein & Hubert/Naturepl.com)

  • IMAGE THREE

(Credit: Nick Garbut/Naturepl.com)

  • IMAGE FOUR

(Credit: Alex Hyde/Naturepl.com)

  • IMAGE FIVE

(Credit: Alex Mustard/Naturepl.com)

  • IMAGE SIX

(Credit: Andy Rouse/Naturepl.com)

  • IMAGE SEVEN

(Credit: Andy Rouse/Naturepl.com)

  • IMAGE EIGHT

(Credit: Alex Hyde/Naturepl.com)

  • IMAGE NINE

(Credit: Michael D. Kern/Naturepl.com)

  • IMAGE TEN

(Credit: XXX/Naturepl.com)

  • IMAGE ELEVEN

(Credit: Mark Taylor/Naturepl.com)

  • IMAGE TWELVE

(Credit: Brandon Cole/Naturepl.com)

  • IMAGE THIRTEEN

(Credit: Danny Green/Naturepl.com)

  • IMAGE FOURTEEN

(Credit: bIngo Arndt/Naturepl.com)

  • IMAGE FIFTEEN

(Credit: Alex Mustard/Naturepl.com)

  • IMAGE SIXTEEN

(Credit: Franco Banfi/Naturepl.com)

  • IMAGE SEVENTEEN

(Credit: Jeff Rotman/Naturepl.com)

ANSWERS

IMAGE ONE

These eyes look a bit like radio speakers but they belong to the common fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster).

IMAGE TWO

If you guessed dog you were close, but these belong to none other than a red fox (Vulpes vulpes).

IMAGE THREE

These belong to a golden-crowned sifaka also called Tattersall’s sifaka (Propithecus tattersalli).

IMAGE FOUR

Four eyes? Greedy… These belong to a species of jumping spider (Phidippus otiosus). Spiders in this group have excellent vision. You would expect so as they have two pairs of four eyes (so eight in total). It helps them to hunt actively rather than catching prey in a web.

IMAGE FIVE

The eyes of this margined sole fish (Brachirus heterolapis) are hard to spot on its camouflaged body.

IMAGE SIX

This one should be easy, yes a tiger, but did you get the subspecies? It’s a Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris).

IMAGE SEVEN

These serious looking eyes belong to a mountain gorilla (Gorilla beringei) female.

IMAGE EIGHT

One to throw you off course. These are not eyes, but eye spot markings on an io moth (Automeris io). They help then to deter and scare off predators and to attract mates.

IMAGE NINE

If you guessed reptile you are on the right track. These belong to a flat-tailed or giant leaf-tailed gecko (Uroplatus fimbriatus). It lives in the tropical rain forests of Madagascar. Its eyes are believed to be 350 times more sensitive than the human eye. This helps it to see colour even at night. If you look closely you will notice it does not have any eyelids, so it has to lick them clean if any dirt obscures its vision.

IMAGE TEN

The crafty disguised eyes of a hare can be seen here (Lepus timidus). Fully white fur allows the hare to stay camouflaged from any lurking predators.

IMAGE ELEVEN

An easy one. Yes it’s a dog – a flatcoated retriever puppy and it’s only six weeks old (awwww).

IMAGE TWELVE

These beautiful blue eyes belong to a fish, but did you guess which species? It’s a blue-eyed triplefin (Notoclinops segmentatus).

IMAGE THIRTEEN

Another primate, this time a snow monkey, also known as a Japanese macaque (Macaca fuscata), found in Japans forested mountain regions.

IMAGE FOURTEEN

The beautiful eye of a red-eyed tree frog (Agalychnis callidryas). Its semi-transparent eyelid allows it to see its surroundings even while resting.

IMAGE FIFTEEN

A harbour or common seal (Phoca vitulina), which as its name suggests, are the most abundant seal species.

IMAGE SIXTEEN

Another canid species, this time the unmistakeable eyes of a Siberian husky dog, commonly used as sled dogs.

IMAGE SEVENTEEN

You will be forgiven for not knowing which creature this ominous eye belongs to. It is that of a short-nosed and stocky lemon shark (Negaprion brevirostris).

(BBC -Earth)

LEAVE A REPLY